NFL Lockout?

If you are going to the Super Bowl at Cowboys Stadium, there is a parking spot still available (.1 mile away) for $990 that offers access to a restroom and allows tailgating. The NFL offers Super Bowl parking at nearby Six Flags for $71.40 with a free shuttle service to the stadium. The cheapest parking is a mile away near Six Flags for $55. You can find a ticket to the game on the web for as low as $4400.

The colossal Cowboys Stadium, hosting this year’s Super Bowl, is now the showcase stadium for the NFL. It holds 110,000 people with the average ticket costing $160 and seat licenses, the fee for the privilege of buying season tickets, running from $3000 to $20,000. Parking for a regular season game costs $50 to $75. Bottled water costs $5, popcorn costs $5.50 to $10, and a 16-oz Miller costs $8.

Cowboys Stadium has the highest average cost for a family of four going to an NFL game at $759. For much less than that, a 50” plasma, HD TV can be purchased and all of the games, and  more, can be enjoyed from the comfort of home. That, of course, is not the same, but it is an interesting comparison – and an alternative.

In 2009, the average NFL player’s salary was $770,000 and the minimum salary was $310,000. Owners claim they are losing money. Green Bay, the only publicly owned professional sports team, says its profit dropped from $20 million to $10 million. That’s a strange way of “losing” money. Other teams refuse to divulge their financial numbers, fueling the disagreement between owners and players.

If the NFL is losing money, it is certainly not evident to fans or those making huge profits from it. The NFL looks very much like the goose that laid the golden egg. A lockout, whatever the reason, will be seen by fans as a slap in the face and the NFL may have a harder time recovering than it did from the 1982 strike.

Perhaps fans should express their opinion by boycotting one NFL game next season (if there is a season). It would send a much-needed message, and that day’s sale of 50” plasma TV’s may provide an even bigger message.

David J. Hentosh

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