Posts Tagged ‘race and racism’

Manipulating Children

February 12, 2015

There is a new Brownie troop formed in Oakland called the “Radical Brownies” which consists of 8 to 10 year-old girls learning and spreading social justice. Co-founder Marilyn Hollinquest says they are not telling the girls what to think, but listen to some of the things these children say and see if you buy that claim:

“White policeman are killing black young folks such as women, men and children”. “Mike Brown. He was shot because he didn’t do nothing. Only the police officer shot him because of his skin color.” “It’s really good for me because it brings out who I am”.

That doesn’t sound very much like independent thoughts of children. It sounds a lot more like brainwashing and propagandizing. These children have been taught that the police are racists and the enemy of the black community and it can only be a matter of time before hatred of the police begins to take hold. Who else will these children begin to hate “without being told”?

Hollingquest has these girls wearing berets similar to the Black Panthers’ berets because she feels it is “appropriate”, and the first badge the girls earned by marching in a Martin Luther King Jr. parade displays a fist and the words “Black Lives Matter”. Hollingquest says that “Kids already understand fairness and unfairness” but a child’s true understanding of “fairness” needs mature guidance and the type of guidance Hollingquest is providing does not seem appropriate.

We pride ourselves on being better than radical Islamic terrorists who brainwash their children to hate Jews and to kill anyone who does not believe as they do. The “Radical Brownies” are certainly a far cry from that and social justice is not akin to Sharia Law, but this does not feel like a good direction for children and it seems to many to be manipulative, abusive, and divisive. Nothing positive for race relations can result from this.

Children need to be children and they shouldn’t be used as puppets by adults with an agenda.

David J. Hentosh

Racist Victimization

May 6, 2014

Liberalism depends on the manipulation of emotions for political gain and it uses victims to tap into those emotions. Racism supplies victims and liberal exploitation of racism has harmed minority communities and fomented civil unrest throughout the country.

Treating people as victims not responsible for what they do is an insult, but this type of condescension brings dependency and, more poignantly, votes. Most in Black, Latino, and Hispanic communities oppose abortion, support traditional marriage, favor school choice, and agree with many conservative views, but “community leaders” and liberal elites ignore this.

For example, 70% of black voters supported California’s Proposition 8 defining marriage as a union between one man and one woman but the arrogant liberal establishment called them homophobes and bigots, considering it a betrayal. In the same way, successful black conservatives such as Clarence Thomas and Condoleezza Rice are called “race traitors”, “Uncle Toms”, or much worse because they don’t toe the established liberal line.

This insistence on conformity is racist. In the past, white racists wanted blacks kept “in their place” and today’s liberal elites insist that their place is the Democratic Party. There is little difference. Years of this have conditioned many to mirror the liberal establishment’s idea of what an African-American should be. Thus, we find some treating those among them striving for achievement as “sellouts” who are acting white. The Hispanic and Latino communities are now being molded in a similar manner.

Martin Luther King’s dream of a colorblind society is a threat to today’s liberal elites. The race card is often the only card they hold on many issues and it is ignorantly brought out at every opportunity as a show-stopper. Voter ID, illegal immigration, deficit reduction, minimum wage, unemployment, abortion, and even global warming are seen as racial issues. Absurdly, even a dislike of Mexican food is being considered racist by some.

These communities deserve more than to be treated as victims. Until that occurs, this country will remain polarized, mired in racism, and unable to move forward.

David J. Hentosh

Sterling Silver Slippery Slope

May 5, 2014

Concerning the Donald Sterling feeding frenzy, NBA Mavericks’ owner Mark Cuban may have said it best: “It’s changed everything for everybody for the foreseeable future…The world has changed. And everybody better realize it. Now you know the consequences of lack of privacy.”

Cuban further warned: “I think you’ve got to be very, very careful when you start making blanket statements about what people say and think, as opposed to what they do. It’s a very, very slippery slope.” Yes, indeed it is. Sterling displayed racism long before this but was given a pass because of his money. This change is frightening, especially with invasion of privacy seeming to be of no concern.

This certainly should frighten Orlando Magic owner Rich DeVos. He has taken a strong stance and spoken out against gay marriage in the past and that’s considered akin to racism by many hardcore progressives. If Sterling can be spied, tried, and fried for voicing an opinion that the NBA considers unacceptable, DeVos could easily be next.

In the 90’s, Cincinnati Reds owner Marge Schott was taken to task for comments made about blacks and Jews. She was punished but she was not stripped of ownership. She eventually sold the team, but it was her decision to do so. Who, then, made the decision that punishment must now be more severe?

Is public opinion, which always sways in the political winds, enough to make that decision? What happens if this society changes? Would it be acceptable for a right-leaning society to determine which opinion should be punished? Will thoughts become punishable?

Slippery slopes certainly do exist and ideological zealots cannot see past their convictions to avoid them. Thought police, much like spaceships, satellites, and holograms, were once the purview of science fiction novels. They may now be coming all too real.

David J. Hentosh

War on Words

August 6, 2013

The continuing war on words is currently being waged in Seattle where City Hall officials are considering “brown bag” and “citizen” to be offensive and in need of being banned from official records. The idea that “brown bag” is racist can only come from a far-left mind obsessed with race and racism. This innocent term has been used for as long one can remember and it is curious that anyone would consider it racist.

This obsessiveness with words being racist is nothing new. A Portland school principal argued that the mention of a peanut butter and jelly sandwich found in a lesson plan was subtly racist because others, such as Somali or Hispanic students, may not eat such sandwiches. What, then, must we do about tofu, prime rib, arugula, or foie gras?

Banning the word “citizen” so as not to offend is just more politically correct foolishness from Seattle. How many non-citizens can there be, not institutionalized, who are so sensitive that the word “citizen” upsets them? Who said it is the government’s responsibility to protect everyone from being offended anyway?

Many of the words that have been banned from standardized testing require a major stretch to rationalize removal, such as: dinosaur, disease, hunting, or abuse. These are common words with common meanings, and sheltering someone from their use does nothing for education.

It is fear of offending rather than the actual act of doing so that is at the root of this foolishness. This fear combines with guilt and an idealistic notion that the world can be made fair for all, creating a need to be a proactive champion of a minority that may consist of only a few people.

Words are not racist, people are, and banning words in an attempt to stop racism is nonsense. It is also nonsense to think that everyone needs to be protected from being offended. There are some who are offended by almost anything that’s said and catering to their sensitivities advances the victimization that permeates today’s society. We need to stop seeing ourselves as victims.

David J. Hentosh